free webpage hit counter

AceBeam L19 2.0 Long Throw Tactical Flashlight Review: Blindingly good

AceBeam L19 2.0 Long Throw Tactical Flashlight Review: Blindingly good

The AceBeam L19 2.0 is light and comfortable enough for either hand-held use, mounted on a rifle or on a FAST helmet, without adding any noticeable weight or being uncomfortable with prolonged use. It runs on a single 21700 battery that is easy to charge over USB-C and can be replaced, and is the brightest flashlight in its class, although I would not recommend using full Turbo mode if you are looking, because Blasting 2200 lumens in all colors goes to scare your quarry.

Specifications

  • Battery: 1 x 21700 (included)
  • Weight: 283 g / 10 oz
  • Driving time: 62 days @ 1 lumen; 1t38m @ 1200 lumens
  • Dimensions: 6.44 “long; 1” pipe diameter; 2.36 “head diameter
  • Maximum brightness: 2200 lumens
  • Maximum throw distance: 1500m
  • Strobe: Yes, 1100 lumens
  • Mountable: Yes, with optional adapter
Benefits

  • Lightweight and easy to install with optional picture rail adapter
  • One button to jump straight to Turbo mode
Cons

  • Turbo mode only runs for about 2 minutes before being dimmed
  • Hard to find the side button in the dark
Buy this product

Do you need to emit a narrow beam of light for up to a mile or so? Something powerful, comfortable to hold, with enough lumen to blind an intruder, as well as a jagged edge to shatter glass (or other things)? Something so at home on the end of a rifle that it is handheld? You want the AceBeam L19 2.0 tactical long-throwing flashlight.

Green or white?

As you can probably see from the pictures, we chose to look at the green version of L19 2.0. This refers to the beam color, not the flashlight, which is currently only available in black. There are actually three versions of this flashlight, although the green has the longest throwing distance:

MAKEUSE OF TODAY’S VIDEO
  • Green with 1520m throw, 2200 lumens brightness
  • White SFT40 with 1023m throw, 2200 lumens
  • White PM1 with 1300m throw, 1650 lumens

But why is it a green alternative at all, you may ask. Both red and green are common for tactical flashlights, where hunting is a primary use. Animals with dichromate views such as foxes and deer are supposedly color blind to green and red light, so they are less likely to scare them. However, this is only true if you do not blow them upwards of 1000 lumens, regardless of color.


Science also tells us that human eyes are more sensitive to the wavelength of green light, so that we can easily select shapes even with relatively low levels of green light. This may be an evolutionary feature to help identify different shades of foliage.

It is also said that green light attracts fewer insects, such as mosquitoes. That one seems to be moving more into urban mutiny, especially when actual studies have shown that they prefer the green light!

Whatever the truth is whether green or red hunting lights are best (this is a debate I would refuse to wade into), the green version of the AceBeam L19 2.0 is lighter and has the longest throw. So that’s the one we’re looking at.

The box’s contents and accessories

Inside the box you will find:

  • AceBeam L19 2.0 flashlight
  • Woven nylon carrying case / holster
  • USBA to USB-C charging cable
  • Bracelet
  • A 21700 battery with a capacity of 5100mAh
  • Spare o-rings and spare switch cover.


If you are stressed out about having to buy another special battery charger, then stop. Rotate the battery and you will find a USB-C port built-in. The battery is a standard 21700 format, so it can be easily replaced – but can also be charged via USB-C without the need for an external charger. You still need to remove the battery from the L19 body to access this charging port, but this seems like an ideal compromise between charging the device and the ability to replace a failing battery or just bring spare parts.

Spare batteries can be purchased for less than $ 20 directly from AceBeam, so you may want to pick one up when ordering. Keep in mind that while the L19 2.0 may be compatible with other brands’ 21700 batteries, they will not necessarily have built-in charging circuits. 21700 specifies a physical size, not features or capacity.

For options, you can also purchase a Picatinny mounting rail adapter, which allows you to quickly attach the L19 2.0 to a rifle or other tactical set, even if you need a hex screw to attach the adapter to the body of the L19. Although it is easy enough to pull it off a picture rail, it is much less comfortable to use handheld with the adapter fitted. L19 is also compatible with a tactical switch, which replaces the end cap and provides an approx. 30 cm wired remote switch.

L19 2.0 design and specifications

The 2.0 version superficially changes the switch and frames from a silver-colored aluminum finish to anodized black, thus reducing the likelihood of reflecting light from your hidden position. There are no other major design deviations from the classic L19 style, although the specifications also got a slight jump.


The L19 2.0 measures 6.44 inches long, with a 1 inch diameter tube that expands to 2.36 inches in diameter at the head. Including the battery, it weighs 285g, or around 10 oz.

It has a comfortable grip with two projections at each end and anti-slip grooves, so it is easy to hold and does not require an extra handle to mount. Since the body never gets too hot, it is very comfortable for long-term hand-held use. The tactical ring on the back is technically detachable, but unless you find that it catches too often on the holster, it is best to leave it on.

L19 2.0 is IP68-classified: waterproof to 5 m (but not a diving light), and has a drop resistance of 1 m. It has a serrated frame in front if you need to break glass in an emergency.

Operation and user interface

Speaking of operation, there are actually two buttons on the L19.

The first and simplest is the lock switch for the end piece. This is a simple on / off switch and it takes you straight to Turbo mode. That’s it. There is no menu system and it locks the second button when it is on. You get the maximum light effect it is capable of.

On the page you will find the standard control button. This feature has the same user interface as all other AceBeam flashlights:

  • A single long press activates super low moonlight mode (1 lumen)
  • A quick press puts the flashlight on the default mode it was last on.
  • When activated, one long press will go through the default modes: Low, Medium 1, Medium 2, High.
  • Quick double press from off or other modes will take you straight to the Turbo.
  • Rapid triple pressure from off or other modes activates the flash.

It’s much easier than it sounds in writing, but my only complaint is that in the dark it’s hard to find the side switch. Unlike other AceBeam models that have a handle in a specific location (and therefore you can remember where the switch is), you can grip the L19 at any angle, and then you have to look around for the button. Of course, if you are desperate for the light, the capsule switch is the easiest to find.

If you have chosen to mount the tactical switch, this end cover switch completely replaces. The tactical switch adds two buttons, one that is an instant turbo activation (you have to hold it down to keep the light on), and the other that simply duplicates the standard control button.

Since L19 can be dangerous in the wrong hands, and potentially dazzle people or animals, a lockout function has also been programmed. Just hold down the button for five seconds and all controls will be locked out. Repeat to deactivate the lock.

L19 2.0 Performance

The AceBeam L19 2.0 header figure has a maximum power of 2200 lumens in Turbo mode. At the opposite end of the spectrum, “moonlight” mode provides only 1 lumen. Standard modes in between these are available at 100, 300, 620 and 1200 lumens, as well as a strobe mode of 1100 lumens. If you roll your eyes at the inclusion of a strobe mode, you do not have to worry, as it is outside the standard operating modes, so it can be safely ignored.

Like all Turbo mode flashlights, the full 2200 lumens are only available for a limited time: 1 minute and 50 seconds in this case. It will then drop to 1600 lumens for ten minutes, then 1200 lumens for another hour and a half.

At the other end of the spectrum, Moonlight mode will run for 62 days.

The L19 uses a TIR (total internal reflection) lens to achieve an extremely dense, narrow beam. Even if the beam distance is stated to be 1.5 km, the light you get so far away will realistically not be useful to any human eye. Nevertheless, the figure serves as a metric to compare with other flashlights in this class. The Nitecore P30i is the closest competitor, with the same price, with an output of 2000 lumens / 1000m throw.


Blindingly good tactical flashlight

The AceBeam L19 2.0 is light and comfortable enough for either hand-held use, mounted on a rifle or on a FAST helmet, without adding any noticeable weight or being uncomfortable with prolonged use. It runs on a single 21700 battery that is easy to charge over USB-C and can be replaced, and is the brightest flashlight in its class, although I would not recommend using full Turbo mode if you are looking, because Blasting 2200 lumens in all colors goes to scare your quarry.

The beam is tight and narrow, but not as narrow as you can get from some laser-excited phosphor or LEP lamps.

At just $ 120, the price is pretty irresistible as well.

That said, if money is not an object and you just want something fancy but don’t particularly need it mountable, I would recommend the X80 GT2.0 (our review). For most people, a floodlight style with a wide beam is just more practical, and eliminates the tunnel vision you get with a flashlight. Holding a lightsaber is fun, but less practical outside of specific use cases.

See also  Reviews - Seething Malevolence - BLABBERMOUTH.NET

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.